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State of Wyoming

Judicial Selection in the States: Wyoming

Overview

News

Georgia has one of the most complex trial court systems in the nation, with at least 6 distinct trial courts (Superior, Probate, State, Magistrate, Municipal,...

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A hearing was held earlier this week on a series of bills filed to address diversity in the Rhode Island judiciary. Video of the hearing...

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The ongoing efforts by members of the Rhode Island House to diversify the bench continues. HB 7908 as filed would require the state s Judicial...

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Courtesy of the Bureau of Justice Statistics, U.S. Department of...

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The Wyoming judiciary is composed of a supreme court, a district court, a circuit court, and a municipal court. The supreme court is the state's appellate court, and the district court is the trial court of general jurisdiction. Judges of the supreme, district, and circuit courts are chosen through a merit selection process, where the governor appoints a judge from a list of three names submitted by the judicial nominating commission. After at least one year in office, the judge stands for retention. If retained, supreme court justices serve eight-year terms, district court judges serve six-year terms, and circuit court judges serve four-year terms. Since Wyoming adopted merit selection of judges in 1972, five judges have been rejected by voters, including a supreme court justice whose 1992 bid for retention failed.